Thursday, December 15, 2011

Chit~Chat Chart...OH YES!

You may have heard or seen this chart as a...blurt chart.  My student teacher and I decided to call it a Chit~Chat Chart.  There is a whole "lotta" chatting going on during large group, small group, and table learning time.  Oh ya...Academic Free Choice is getting a little loud, too!  We decided to use this Chit~Chat Chart to visually remind our students when it is appropriate to talk and not talk.  Because...learning should be fun and it is not going to be fun if the teacher sounds like....WOH~WOH~WOH...WOH~WOH! 

The funny thing is...it is my student teacher's head week and last night she went home and made a chart for the classroom without telling me she was going to (good for her!) and I came to school early this morning to make one for her to surprise her.  Now we have two charts to share visually with you!  Now...you get to vote which one is better.  No...Joking but I would like to share both.


Cooperating Teacher's Chit~Chat Chart
I used post-it notes for the strips to pull off and on.

Student Teacher's Chit~Chat Chart 
Made professionally at a print shop...just thought you should know.  HE HE HE
She used Velcro to put the cards on and off.

If a student is talking while the teacher or another student is talking I will remove one of the red cards from his/her name on the chart.  Sometimes I will say why I am removing the card and sometimes I will just remove the card and keep teaching.  If a student looses all 3 cards before recess he/she will have to stay in from recess and we will talk about what they need to do to fix it.  Right now...we are lucky enough to have 3 different times that the students will loose recess, Academic Free Choice, or computers during the day.  All the cards go back on the board at 9:45 and 12:30.  I really hope this helps!  What do you use to help control classroom chatter?  Thanks in advance for any advice!!!             

25 comments:

  1. OMG you know this is a great idea. MY KIDS ARE TALKING all the time! I am so making one for Monday!

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  2. I use a music box. But this is a whole class technique. If my students are too loud or are talking during no talking time I open the box. When they hear the music they know they need to quiet down or be quiet. At the end of the day we open the box to see if any music is left. If there is they get to put a smiley face on our smiley face chart. When they fill it up they get a dumdum break.
    I love this idea for individual students talking.

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  3. At my elementary school detention was "sentences" - and we got 3+ sentences depending on what we did...

    One "sentence" =
    "Life is a series of choices. The choice I made has brought with it the consequence of writing these sentences. Next time maybe I will make a different choice."

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  4. Wow! I love it! So I know how you do it for group time...but what about small group? I'm wondering how I would use it during my Literacy Centers. Would you pull one if they get too loud while they are working or having an issue at their table whil you are trying to work with a group? Or during writer's workshop, talking when they should be working?

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  5. Wow! I love it! So I know how you do it for group time...but what about small group? I'm wondering how I would use it during my Literacy Centers. Would you pull one if they get too loud while they are working or having an issue at their table whil you are trying to work with a group? Or during writer's workshop, talking when they should be working?

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  6. wow... you only have 17 kiddos?? thaat's amazing! we have 23-24 per kindergarten classroom.

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  7. !& kids is awesome, my smallest class was 20, now I have 32 so chit-chat is always going on. The past few weeks have been insane, just may have to try this, plus my fired owns print shop. he he he

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  8. I love it! I'm sketching it our right now! I have 10 girls and 4 boys and the chit-chat is non-stop! (not to mention playing with each other's hair, trading bracelets..... UGH!)

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  9. This is great for whole group and then I love the music box for small group time. Thanks for the ideas.

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  10. LOVE IT! I will be using this!

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  11. 25 third graders will see this on Monday morning...great idea! Thanks!

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  12. Hi! Just got done hanging my chart. Thank you for sharing the idea. So is your kinder full day or half day? You mentioned that the cards go back at 9:45 and 12:30...does that mean if all 3 are removed before recess, they miss recess (or whatever you do) and then after recess they go back for a fresh start. I've tried this, but I wondered if that was giving them too many chances. I thought of just using the 3 chances for the whole day of school...what do you think? Still coming up with consequences...I don't want to spend ALL of my recesses stuck in my room...Thanks again!

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  13. Hi Jenn,
    I teach in a full day kindergarten. I could not imagine it any other way. I have a hard enough time trying to "fit" everything in.

    Let's just say that my day is broken up into 4 parts. The first part of the day if a student looses all 3 cards he/she will have to stay in at recess (or loose some of free choice). During this time we discuss why he/she has lost some recess time. Then all the red cards go back up again and we start all over for part 2 of the day.

    It has been up long enough now that I have my day divided into 2 parts. The chart has helped my teaching time tremendesly. Most of my students do not want to miss recess and are working hard at not blurting or talking to a friend during instruction time. Hopefully...I am building a "good" habit.

    Yes...at first you might feel like you are spending most of your recess inside your classroom with a couple or one kiddo...but hopefully it will not take long and they will all realize that they would rather be outside with their friends than inside with you.

    I hope this helps! Good luck and you will know what works for you in your classroom. Amber

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  14. Would this work for an older age group? I teach 5th grade and my kids talk ALL the time.

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  15. I have the same problem, sometimes I tell them to finish talking for a minute then we will continue.
    Thank you

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  16. What a wonderful idea! Thanks for sharing!

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  17. Love it! I am going to have to try this with my second graders! :)

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  19. Why not change the child's seat if they cannot stop talking? That would be a logical consequence. Or have them sit near you?

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    Replies
    1. Some children talk at every single seat you put them at.

      Delete
  20. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  21. Can you make it so that I can see the pictures? I am not sure why but all I can see is a ! in an upside down triangle.

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  22. I teach a resource class that is usually small, but this past year I had up to 22 in one class.

    I list all of their names on one end of the white board, and extend lines out to separate them into their own rows for about 6-8 inches past their names.

    As students are working well, about every 20-30 min, I say that the student in charge this week (we have a lot of jobs) cab give them all 2-3 points. That means each student gets that many tallies next to their names.

    If students talk, interrupt, blurt out, play in their desk, etc I walk over and erase one of their points. They either hear me walk over to that area, or hear the other students suddenly get quiet, and notice that lost a point. If there are only a few students trying to answer questions that I ask, or if one has a great insightful answer, I give extra points for that.

    Students practice writing and counting with tally marks. Before class ends each day, another student counts the tallies per student and then I (or the kids later in the year) divide the total by 3 (then by 4,5, and 6 with the new quarters).

    Another student passes out tickets (extra copied assignments cut up into 2 inch squares). Students write initials on their tickets and then put them into a basket that another student collects with (we stop about 5 min early to do tickets).

    On Fridays we have a drawing at the end of the class, picking 3 names. Winners get to pick from a box of things that my own kids or peers were going to send to the thrift store, or else they get a small candy bar.

    It really seems to keep their behavior under control.

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  23. Now that I shared my usual routine, I'd like to share an additional one that I had to use with so many names ADHD students added this year to my class.

    I gave each of them a "friend" which was a 1/2 sheet of paper with the left side having a sketch of a kid raising his hand as he covered his mouth with the other hand; and the right side having a sketch of a kid that is blurting out. There are about 30 boxed spaces under each sketch.

    Students are asked to get out their friend each day. If they can find it (showing they are organized), they can check off 1 on the good side. If they can't find it, then they are given a new one and need to start over again.

    They put their friend on their desk until it is time to leave. During class, every time they blurt out, I point to their friend and they mark on the bad side.

    After we finish an assignment, or if they have all been very quiet, I tell them the can mark 1-2 good side boxes.

    If they fill up the bad side before the good side, they will need to write sentences for me. If they fill up the good side first (and it took over a month) then they get a special reward.
    They get a new friend after they fill it up. One 'bad boy' filled his up much faster than his peers (we both know he cheated) so he got a smaller reward.

    This helps them be aware of how much they blurt out.

    This strategy helped me a lot this year!

    ReplyDelete
  24. Now that I shared my usual routine, I'd like to share an additional one that I had to use with so many names ADHD students added this year to my class.

    I gave each of them a "friend" which was a 1/2 sheet of paper with the left side having a sketch of a kid raising his hand as he covered his mouth with the other hand; and the right side having a sketch of a kid that is blurting out. There are about 30 boxed spaces under each sketch.

    Students are asked to get out their friend each day. If they can find it (showing they are organized), they can check off 1 on the good side. If they can't find it, then they are given a new one and need to start over again.

    They put their friend on their desk until it is time to leave. During class, every time they blurt out, I point to their friend and they mark on the bad side.

    After we finish an assignment, or if they have all been very quiet, I tell them the can mark 1-2 good side boxes.

    If they fill up the bad side before the good side, they will need to write sentences for me. If they fill up the good side first (and it took over a month) then they get a special reward.
    They get a new friend after they fill it up. One 'bad boy' filled his up much faster than his peers (we both know he cheated) so he got a smaller reward.

    This helps them be aware of how much they blurt out.

    This strategy helped me a lot this year!

    ReplyDelete

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